Symptoms

The paragraphs below were taken from the Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Symptoms vary depending on whether motor, sensory, or autonomic nerves are damaged. Sensory nerves transmit information such as the feeling of a light touch or the pain from a cut. Autonomic nerves control organ activities that are regulated automatically such as breathing, digesting food, and heart and gland functions. Motor nerves control voluntary movement of muscles such as those used for walking, grasping things, or talking. Some neuropathies may affect all three types of nerves; others primarily affect one or two types. Doctors may use terms such as predominantly motor neuropathy, predominantly sensory neuropathy, sensory-motor neuropathy, or autonomic neuropathy to describe the types of nerves involved in an individual’s condition.

Sensory nerve damage causes a variety of symptoms because sensory nerves have a broad range of functions. Larger sensory fibers enclosed in myelin register vibration, light touch, and position sense. Damage impairs touch, resulting in a general decrease in sensation. Since this is felt most in the hands and feet, people may feel as if they are wearing gloves and stockings even when they are not. This damage to sensory fibers may contribute to the loss of reflexes. Loss of position sense often makes people unable to coordinate complex movements like walking or fastening buttons, or to maintain their balance when their eyes are shut.

Smaller sensory fibers without myelin sheaths transmit pain and temperature sensations. Damage to these fibers can interfere with the ability to feel pain or changes in temperature. People may fail to sense that they have been injured from a cut or that a wound is becoming infected. Others may not detect pain that warns of impending heart attack or other acute conditions. Loss of pain sensation is a particularly serious problem for people with diabetes, contributing to the high rate of lower limb amputations among this population.

Neuropathic pain is a common, often difficult to control symptom of sensory nerve damage and can seriously affect emotional well-being and overall quality of life. Often worse at night, neuropathic pain seriously disrupts sleep and adds to the emotional burden of sensory nerve damage. Neuropathic pain can often be associated with an over-sensitization of pain receptors in the skin, so that people feel severe pain (allodynia) from stimuli that are normally painless. For example, some may experience pain from bed sheets draped lightly over the body. Over many years, sensory neuropathy may lead to changes in the skin, hair, as well as to joint and bone damage. Unrecognized injuries due to poor sensation contribute to these changes, so it is important for people with neuropathy to inspect numb areas for injury or damage.

Autonomic nerve damage symptoms are diverse since the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves of the peripheral nervous system control nearly every organ in the body. Common symptoms of autonomic nerve damage include an inability to sweat normally, which may lead to heat intolerance; a loss of bladder control; and an inability to control muscles that expand or contract blood vessels to regulate blood pressure. A drop in blood pressure when a person moves suddenly from a seated to a standing position (a condition known as postural or orthostatic hypotension) may result in dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting. Irregular heartbeats may also occur.

Gastrointestinal symptoms may accompany autonomic neuropathy. Malfunction of nerves controlling intestinal muscle contractions can lead to diarrhea, constipation, or incontinence. Many people also have problems eating or swallowing if autonomic nerves controlling these functions are affected.

Motor nerve damage is most commonly associated with muscle weakness. Other symptoms may include painful cramps and fasciculations (uncontrolled muscle twitching visible under the skin), muscle atrophy (severe shrinkage of muscle size), and decreased reflexes.

B6 Toxicity Symptoms

Below is a list of symptoms reported by the members of the B6T Smart Understanding B6 Toxicity Facebook Group. Click on the highlighted symptoms for more detailed information.

  • Acid Reflux
  • Anxiety/Tension/Nervousness
  • Arthralgia
  • Arthritic/arthraglic pain in extremities and certain joints
  • Asthma
  • Back pain
  • Bladder pain
  • Bloating
  • Blood volume issues (low)
  • Bone pain
  • Bradycardia
  • Brain fog and/or mental clarity problems
  • Breast soreness
  • Bruising (unexplained)
  • Bulging veins
  • Burning in feet
  • Burning nerves
  • Burning skin sensation
  • Burning tongue
  • Burping
  • Cherry angiomas
  • Chest pain
  • Chest tightness
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Constipation
  • Costochondritis
  • Cramps
  • Deep virus-like sleep/waking suddenly unable to breathe
  • Degenerated/bulging disks
  • Dehydration
  • Delayed onset muscle pain/weakness/spasm
  • Dental Issues
  • Depression
  • Derealization/depersonalization
  • Dermatographia (mild)
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty falling asleep
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Dimples (in muscles/swiss cheese patterned)
  • Dizziness
  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth 
  • Dry skin
  • Ear pain
  • Easy arousal once asleep
  • Easy to burst small blood vessels in fingers
  • Epigastric burning/pain
  • Erythematous mucosa
  • Esophageal spasms
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Eyelid hemorrhage
  • Fainting
  • Fasciculations
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling like you’re on a boat
  • Flushing
  • Folate- Low blood tests
  • Forgetfulness
  • Freezing nerves
  • Frequent urination
  • Gait problems or difficulty walking
  • Gallbladder issues
  • GERD (upper digestive issues)
  • Hair loss
  • Halos
  • Headaches
  • Heart rhythm issues (palpitations, PVC, etc.)
  • HIDA scan abnormal
  • Hiatal Hernia
  • High inflammation blood work
  • Histamine issues 
  • Hives
  • Hyperacusis
  • Hyperalgesia
  • IBS/GI symptoms
  • Inflamed stomach muscles
  • Ingrown toe nails
  • Insomnia
  • Involuntary Musical Imagery
  • Irregular heartbeat (high and low)
  • Itching
  • Jerking sensations in head/electrical zaps
  • Keratisis pilaris
  • Leg pain
  • Lightheadedness
  • Light sensitivity
  • Limbs falling asleep
  • Loss of (or diminished) joint position sense
  • Loss of libido/sexual disfunction
  • Loss of muscle
  • Loss of night vision
  • Low blood pressure
  • Low body temperature
  • Low pancreatic test
  • Lower back pain
  • Lump under foot feeling
  • Mid back itching & numbness
  • Migraines
  • Motion sickness
  • Mouth sores
  • Muscle twitches
  • Muscle weakness
  • Muscle/joint pain
  • Nausea
  • Nightmares
  • No reflexes
  • Noise:  sensitive to loud noises 
  • Numb gums
  • Numbness
  • Numbness in feet
  • Numbness starting in feet up calf and to the knee
  • Orthostatic lightheadedness
  • Pain and sensitivity in palms and soles of feet
  • Painful swallowing
  • Palinopsia
  • Palpitations
  • Panic attacks
  • Pinprick or coldprick sensations
  • Plantar fasciitis pain
  • Poor tolerance to medication/adverse reaction with few doses
  • Popping hips when walking
  • Positive ANA/Auto antibodies not prior to B6T
  • Proprioception issues (proprioception – awareness of the position or movement of the body)
  • Red dots on back, shoulders, trunk
  • Red ears 
  • Red eyes
  • Red or purple top of foot
  • Rib cage soreness
  • Ridged fingernails and toe nails
  • Sciatica
  • Sensitivity to cold and/or heat
  • Severe bloating
  • Shooting pains in extremities
  • Shortness of breath
  • Skin rash
  • Skin sensitive to touch (allodynia)
  • Spasms
  • Spider veins
  • Spots on tongue
  • Stiff muscles in legs
  • Stools: lighter, undigested food, contains mucous, fat or bubbles
  • Sudden unexplained flaccid arms/limbs
  • Sweating:  inability to sweat or too much sweating
  • Swelling of the exterior ear
  • Swollen tongue
  • Tachycardia
  • Tearing corneas
  • Temperature dysregulation
  • Thirst (extreme)
  • Thyroid changes
  • Tingling in hands
  • Tingling/Goosebumps
  • Tinnitus
  • Twitching
  • Ulcers
  • Ulnar nerve entrapment
  • Upper neck and/or shoulder pain
  • Urine: cloudy, sticky, burning
  • Varicose veins
  • Vertigo
  • Vibrations
  • Vision loss
  • Visual disturbances (double vision, visual processing, visual snow, floaters, trails, geometric patterns in the dark, etc.) 
  • Vomiting
  • Waves of weakness
  • Weight gain
  • Weight loss

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